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Summer Week 6 - 18.5.20

Mrs Ryder's Assembly 28 5 20

English

 

Well done for writing predictions last week. Having an opinion about something is easy but very tricky when you have to explain why! We saw some brilliant predictions last week so well done. This week we are continuing our journey in to Flotsam. Flotsam is completely different to any type of book that we have learnt about in year 4 as there are no words...the author is telling a story through a series of images. This week we would like you to do the below.

 

1. Click on the link to the Flotsam book on YouTube. Watch it a couple of times and talk through it with an adult at home if you can. What story are the pictures telling us? 

 

2. We have picked out twelve key points of the story and put them in to a PDF file titled 'Images for Flotsam'. Have a look and then watch the video again so you can see where these pictures are in relation to the story.

 

3. For each image, write a few words/sentences that describes what you can see and what is happening. I have completed this for one of the images for you to have a look at below in the PDF file 'Modelled Example' so you can get the idea.

 

4. Have a look at the link to an Oliver Jeffers book. Watch this a couple of times. Do you notice that there are only a few sentences on each page telling the story? A lot of the story comes from the images and how your imagination interprets them.

 

5. Can you create this with the Flotsam story? For each picture write a couple of sentences that would tell a reader what is happening in the story. Use the words that you did for step 3 to help you. I have also added an example of this to the PDF file 'Modelled Example' so you can see what our expectations are. 

 

Enjoy!  Any questions, as always, please don't hesitate to contact us.

 

Flotsam By David Wiesner

Lost and Found by Oliver Jeffers

Maths

White Rose Week 5 lesson 1

This is "Step 1 - Recognise tenths and hundredths" by White Rose Maths on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

Year 4 - Week 5 - Lesson 2 - Equivalent fractions (1)

This is "Year 4 - Week 5 - Lesson 2 - Equivalent fractions (1)" by White Rose Maths on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

Year 4 - Week 5 - Lesson 3 - Equivalent fractions (2)

This is "Year 4 - Week 5 - Lesson 3 - Equivalent fractions (2)" by White Rose Maths on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

Year 4 - Week 5 - Lesson 4 - Fractions greater than 1

This is "Year 4 - Week 5 - Lesson 4 - Fractions greater than 1" by White Rose Maths on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

History / Topic

This week celebrates International Museum Day (18th May). This day has been celebrated since 1977 and is particularly important to Plymouth this year. The Box, our newly revamped muesum, should have opened on Saturday 16th May, but for obvious reasons cannot. Let's celebrate the week by learning a little about the Box and by creating our own museums at home.

 

Below are some links to some museums, but a quick online search will take you to some fantastic virtual tours that you might wish to do before you start.

 

For our Stone Age project, we created our own mini Stone Age muesums in class. Now, we'd like to see what you can create at home. You'll need to think of a theme that you can base your exhibits/content on. You might choose your own family, Plymouth through history, your street or any topic that interests you.

 

If your museum is about your family, you could research your family tree by speaking to them. You might also gather pictures and videos that tell you a little about what happened in the past. You don't need to have a physical object, pictures are perfectly fine, so relatives could email you an image of something that is important to your family history.

 

If your museum is about Plymouth or your street, you could gather some 'artefacts' on your daily exercise. These could be photos or even crayon rubbings of interesting things like post boxes and possibly even the manhole covers that you walk on or over everyday. If you have an object could you make a museum information card about the artefact? These would normally say what it is and the date and where it came from.

 

The museum does not need to be an object based museum either. You could make a PowerPoint or a book of history. Whatever you create, please share them with us so that we can add them to the blog/website. I'm sure others would love to see what you've created.

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